IncMan SOAR Platform Features – New and Improved

DFLabs is excited to announce the latest release of its industry-leading Security Orchestration, Automation and Response platform, IncMan version 4.3.  Solving customer’s problems and adding value to our customer’s security programs is one of our core goals here at DFLabs and this is reflected in our 4.3 release with over 100 enhancements, additions, and fixes; many suggested by customers, all designed to make the complex task of responding to potential security incidents faster, easier and more efficient.

IncMan 4.3 includes many new bidirectional integrations from a variety of product categories including threat intelligence, malware analysis, ticket management and endpoint protection, chosen to broaden the orchestration and automation capabilities of our customers.  These new bidirectional integrations include:

With IncMan 4.3, we have also greatly enhanced the flexibility of our R3 Rapid Response Runbooks with the addition of two new decision nodes; Filter and User Choice.  Filter nodes allow users to further filter and refine information returned by previously executed integrations; for example, filtering IT asset information to include only servers, focusing on key assets first.  Unlike automated Enrichment actions, automated Containment actions could have serious unintended impacts on the organization. User Choice nodes allow users to minimize this risk by allowing them to define critical junctions in the workflow at which a human must intervene and make a decision.  For example, human verification may be required before banning a hash value across the enterprise or quarantining a host pending further analysis.

incman soar platform

Improvements to our patent-pending Automated Responder Knowledge (DF-ARK) module allow IncMan to make even more intelligent decisions when suggesting response actions, and enhancements to IncMan’s correlation engine allow users a more advanced view of the threat landscape over time and across the organization.  IncMan’s report engine has been significantly bolstered, allowing users to create more flexible reports for a variety of purposes than ever before. Finally, numerous changes have been made to IncMan’s Dashboard and KPI features, allowing users to create more actionable KPIs and gather a complete picture of the organization’s current state of security at a moment’s glance.

These are just some of the highlights of our latest IncMan release; IncMan 4.3 includes many other enhancements designed to streamline your orchestration, automation and response process.  If you would like a demo of our latest release, please go to our demo request site. Stay tuned to our website for additional updates, feature highlights,  and demos of our latest release.

The Top 5 Challenges Faced by Security Operations Centers

Not so long ago we used to hear about a cyber-attack or a new form of vulnerability in the news perhaps on a quarterly or monthly basis.  Today, they are becoming increasingly more frequent and I don’t think a day goes by that we don’t read in the headlines about the consequences an organization is having to face, due to another attack. McAfee recently reported a staggering eight new cyber threats a second in Q4 2017.  

With the sophistication of attacks also continuously evolving, the modern CISO is now facing up to the fact and preparing for a “when it will happen” scenario as opposed to “if it will happen”, as cyber incidents become more inevitable. Based on this, their cybersecurity strategy is being turned on its head and instead of focusing more on how to prevent an incident from occurring in the first place, they are now heavily investing in technologies and solutions to help identify, manage and contain an incident, in order to minimize the impact to the organization when it does occur.  

In larger enterprises today, it is common to have a Security Operations Center (SOC) and/or a Computer Security Incident Response Team (CSIRT) to monitor, manage and respond to incoming security alerts, but with this, there are numerous challenges that are continuously being faced.  Our recent blog “How to Implement Incident Response Automation the Right Way” specifically addressed the challenge of increasing volumes of alerts, resulting in an exponential volume of mundane tasks and discussed how utilizing automation should be implemented to overcome this. In reality, the number of challenges is probably many more than what we will cover in this blog, but here are our top five, which we believe are currently having the biggest effect on SOCs and CSIRTs today.

Top 5 Challenges Faced by Security Operations Centers

1.  Increasing Volumes of Security Alerts

With the snowballing number of security alerts being received, valuable analyst time is being consumed sorting through a plethora of security alerts.  Most commonly, time is wasted performing a multitude of mundane tasks to triage and determine the veracity of the alerts, often resulting in alerts being missed or those of more damaging consequences slipping through the net as they are overlooked.  As you can probably imagine, analysts time would be better spent working on the more sophisticated alerts that need human intervention, as well as proactively threat hunting, in order to minimize the time from breach discovery to resolution.

 2. Management of Numerous Security Tools

As a wider range of security suites are being adopted by SOCs and CSIRTs, it is becoming ever more difficult to effectively monitor all of the data being generated from the multiplying number of data points and sources.  A typical security operations center may use a combination of 20 or more technologies, which understandably can be difficult to monitor and manage individually. It is therefore important to be able to have a central source and single platform to summarize all of the information as it is being generated and to be able to have a helicopter view of your overall security environment to manage, monitor, and measure security operations and incident response processes effectively.

3.  Competition for Skilled Analysts and Lack of Knowledge Transfer Between Analysts

With the global cybersecurity talent shortage to hit 1.2m by 2020 and to increase to 1.8m by 2022, the pool of suitable analysts will only continue to diminish over time, with the level of competition becoming more fierce for analysts that have the required skill set.  As with most companies and industries, workforce comes and goes, but knowledge transfer is particularly important within a security operations center and incident response teams, in order to ensure the correct response and process takes place within the minimal amount of time, reducing the time to incident detection and time to incident resolution. This lack of knowledge transfer can inevitably lead to increased response times and wasted resources.

4. Budget Constraints with Security Incidents Becoming More Costly

As within most organizations large or small alike, budgets are always restricted in some way, shape or form. In order to authorize spending, a clear positive ROI usually needs to be forecast and/or proven. Security operations and incident response are notoriously difficult to measure, monitor and manage, (why not read our recent whitepaper entitled “KPIs for Security Operations and Incident Response” to learn more), so justifying spend is always difficult.  With the increasing number of cyber-attacks, organizations are increasing the level of investment in cyber security tools, but what level of spending is necessary and what amount outweighs the benefits it will achieve? Can you put a price on the consequences of a potential incident such as a data breach, knowing you will likely face a hefty fine, as well as brand and reputation damage?

5. Legal and Regulatory Compliance

Meeting a growing number of legal and regulatory compliance such as NIST, PCI, GLBA, FISMA, HITECH (HIPPA) and GDPR to name a few, as well as industry best practices, will inherently have an impact on any organization, but can have a heavy bearing depending on the specific industry or geographical location.  Using the example of the upcoming Global Data Protection Regulation, taking effect on May 25, 2018, it is even more important for security operations centers to have mandatory processes and procedures clearly in place which are conducted in a legally and policy-compliant manner.  Providing sufficient incident reporting and breach notification within the required parameters (in the case of GDPR to notify the supervisory authority within 72 hrs of a breach) is going to be key, or the legal, financial and reputational impact and repercussions could be significant.      

Based on these five challenges alone, enterprise SOCs and CSIRTs are struggling to remain efficient and effective and are increasingly being forced to do more with less, while striving to keep up with the current threat landscape and a plethora of security alerts.  

With security incidents becoming more costly, enterprises need to find new ways to further reduce the mean time to detection and resolution.  As a result, security and risk management leaders will see the business need to invest in Security Orchestration, Automation and Response (SOAR) technology and tools, such as the IncMan SOAR platform from DFLabs, to help improve their security operations proficiency, efficacy, and quality, in order to keep their cyber incident under control.

If you are interested in reading more about how SOAR technology can help to address these challenges in more detail, look out for our future blog on the topic coming soon.

How SMART Are Your Security Program KPIs?

We have all heard about Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and how critical they can be for your security program, but confusion remains surrounding what KPIs are important to track and how they can be used to measure and improve the organization’s security program. Tracking KPIs is great, but if those KPIs are not relevant and actionable; if you are tracking KPI’s just for the sake of tracking KPIs and they are not being used to inform your security program, your KPIs will become more of a detriment than an enabler for your security program.

At its core, a KPI is a way of measuring the success or failure of a business goal, function or objective, and a means of providing actionable information on which decisions can be based.  Quality KPIs serve as a security program enabler and driver for continuous improvement. This is true of both the tactical functions of security operations – looking for attack patterns and trends of malicious activity, as well as the strategic functions of security operations – identifying program gaps and making long-term program decisions.

KPIs should focus on assessing a goal or function and providing actionable information on which decisions can be made.  The most effective way to develop meaningful KPIs is to start by identifying which security operations goals or functions are the most critical to the security operations program, then developing KPIs to measure those critical goals or functions. KPIs which will not inform the decision-making process in some way are unnecessary and should be avoided, they will serve only to muddy the waters.

When choosing KPIs to measure, quality should be valued above quantity.  Each KPI should have a meaning to the organization and add value to the security program. There are many different methods for evaluating the effectiveness of a KPI; here we will use the acronym SMART.  Each KPI should be:

  • Simple– KPIs should not be overly complicated to measure.  It should be clear what the purpose of each KPI is and how it impacts the security program.
  • Measurable– A KPI must be able to be measured in some way, quantitatively or qualitatively.  The method by which each KPI is measured should be clearly defined and consistent.
  • Actionable– KPIs should be used as a driver for decisions.  The purpose of a KPI is to measure performance, and if necessary, take some action based on the results.  A KPI which is not actionable serves little to no purpose.
  • Relevant– Each KPI should be a measurement of the function being assessed; in this case, the security program.  KPIs which are simple, measurable and actionable, but are not relevant to the function being assessed will be of little value.
  • Time-Based– KPIs can and should be used to show changes over time.  An effective KPI should be able to be collected and grouped by various time intervals to show variations and patterns.

There will never be a set of “correct” KPIs to measure; the goals and objectives for each organization will always be different, and the organization’s KPIs should reflect the individual priorities.  The key to choosing KPIs which will have a real, actionable impact on the organization’s security program is to ensure that the KPIs are SMART, focus on the six most common components of a successful security operations program, and are used to further the security program.

For more detailed information on how your organization can use KPIs to enhance your security program, check out our whitepaper “ Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s) for Security Operations and Incident Response” here

For more information on how DFLabs IncMan can help your organization manage your cyber incidents, including tracking meaningful, actionable KPIs, check out our website here or contact us here.

How DFLabs IncMan Tackles Meltdown and Spectre Vulnerabilities

Following on from my recent blog post entitled “Meltdown and Spectre – What They Mean to the Enterprise” published in January, I wanted to take a closer look at how these types of hardware vulnerabilities could (and should) easily be detected, managed and mitigated using Security Orchestration, Automation and Response (SOAR) technology, for example with a platform such as IncMan from DFLabs.

Using Meltdown and Spectre as a use case, I wanted to enlighten you about the automated processes an organization can undertake.  There are many pros and cons for using automation, but if used in the correct way it can significantly improve Security Operations Center (SOC) efficiencies, saving security analyst many man hours of mundane tasks.  Alerts can also potentially be responded to and contained before an analyst has even been notified.  Using IncMan’s integrations and R3 Rapid Response Runbooks, SOCs can quickly respond to such an alert when a vulnerability is detected.  The overall goals would be as follows, in order to reduce the risk these vulnerabilities present to the organization.

1)  Automatically receive alerts for the host which have been identified as being vulnerable to Meltdown or Spectre.

2) Create an Incident and perform automated Notification, Enrichment and Containment tasks.

Implementation

Let’s move on to the implementation stages.  Where should you start? For ease I will break it down into 3 simple sections, creating a runbook, utilizing the rebook and seeing the runbook in action.  So, let’s begin…

Creating an R3 Rapid Response Runbook

The first step in reducing the risk from the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities is to create a runbook to handle alerts for newly detected vulnerable hosts.  In this use case, we will use integrations with Jira, McAfee ePO, McAfee Web Gateway, MSSQL Server and QRadar to perform Notification, Enrichment and Containment actions; however, this can easily be adapted to include any other technology integrations as well.

 

Meltdown and Spectre Vulnerabilities

 

Using a Jira Notification action, a new Jira issue is created.  This Notification action should notify the IT or Infrastructure teams and initiate the organizations’ normal vulnerability management process.

Next, an MSSQL Server Enrichment action is used to query an IT asset inventory for the host name of the vulnerable host, which is passed to the runbook automatically when the incident is created.  This asset information is then available to the analyst for further review.

Once the IT asset information is retrieved, a decision point is reached.  If the IT asset information indicates that the host is a server, one path (the top path) is taken.  If the IT asset information indicates that the host is not a server, another path (the bottom path) is taken.

If the asset is determined to be a server the Jira Enrichment action is used to update the Jira issue, informing the appropriate parties that the host has been determined to be a server and should be treated as a higher priority.  Next, two McAfee ePO Enrichment actions are performed.  The first Enrichment action queries McAfee ePO for the system information of the given host name, providing the analyst with additional information.  The second Enrichment action uses McAfee ePO to tag the host with the appropriate tag.  Finally, a Task is added to IncMan reminding the analyst to follow up with the appropriate teams to ensure that the vulnerability has been appropriately mitigated.

If the asset is determined not to be a server, the two previously mentioned McAfee ePO Enrichment actions are immediately be run (System Info and TAG).  Following these two Enrichment actions, a McAfee Web Gateway Containment action is used to block the host from communicating outside of the network.  This Containment step is completely optional but is performed here on non-servers only to minimize the Containment action’s potential impact on critical systems.

Utilizing the R3 Rapid Response Runbook

Once the new runbook is created, IncMan must be told how and when to automate the use of this runbook.  This is achieved by creating an Incident Template, which will be used any time an incident is generated for a Meltdown or Spectre vulnerability.  Through this incident template, critical pieces of information such as Type, Summary, Category can be automatically applied to the newly created incident.

 

Meltdown and Spectre Vulnerabilities 1

 

From the Runbook tab of the Incident Template wizard, the previously created Meltdown and Spectre runbook is selected and set to autorun.  Each time this template is used to generate an incident, the appropriate information such as host name and host IP address will be used as inputs to the runbook and the runbook will be automatically executed.

 

Meltdown and Spectre Vulnerabilities 2

 

In this use case, alerts from QRadar are utilized to initiate automatic incident creation within IncMan.  However, another SIEM integration, syslog or email could also be utilized to achieve the same outcome.  A new QRadar Incoming Event Automation rule is added and the defined action is to generate a new incident from the previously created Meltdown and Spectre Incident Template.

 

Meltdown and Spectre Vulnerabilities

 

Solution in Action

When a QRadar Alert is generated matching the criteria defined for a Meltdown or Spectre vulnerability detection, IncMan will automatically generate a new incident based on the Meltdown and Spectre Incident Template.

 

Meltdown and Spectre Vulnerabilities

 

Without requiring any action on the part of an analyst, the Meltdown and Spectre runbook is automatically initiated, performing the defined Notification, Enrichment and Containment actions.(In the example shown here, the ‘server’ path is taken).

 

Meltdown and Spectre Vulnerabilities 5

 

Conclusion

How easy was that?  The entire process has taken place in a matter of minutes, likely before anyone has even had time to acknowledge the alert.  As an analyst begins to manually examine the alert, many of the mundane tasks have already been completed, allowing the analyst to focus on the tasks which require human intervention and reducing the time required to remediate this issue, ultimately reducing risk to the organization.

IncMan has over 100 customizable playbooks for similar use cases like this.  If you would like to see IncMan in action, please do feel free to request a demo.