Five Critical Components of SOAR Technology

In our previous two blogs, we looked at some of the most common problems a Security Orchestration, Automation and Response (SOAR) Technology is designed to solve and the three pillars of a SOAR solution. We will round out this three-part series by taking a more detailed look at some of the most critical SOAR Technology components any SOAR solution should possess. While some of these components may be more critical than others to individual organizations, each plays an important role in the overall function of a SOAR solution and should be considered when evaluating different platforms.

1. Customizability and Flexibility

No two security programs will be alike; this is especially true when you cross vertical lines. For a SOAR solution to be effective, it should be capable of being the single tool on top of the security stack. A SOAR solution should be able to be implemented in a manner that is optimized for CSIRT teams, as well as SOCs, MSSPs and security teams. Data input from a multitude of sources, including machine to machine, email, user submissions and manual input should be supported. The importance of security metrics means that customers should be able to customize not only the values available in the solution but also what attributes are tracked as well.

The number of security solutions, commercial, open source, and developed in-house means that any viable SOAR solution must be flexible enough to support a multitude of security products. Any SOAR solution will support many security products out of the box, however, the likelihood that all the organization’s security products will be supported by default is low. For that reason, it is crucial that a SOAR solution has a flexible option in place that allows customers to easily create bi-directional integrations with security products which are not supported by default.  

2. Process Workflows

One of the key benefits of a SOAR solution is being able to automate and orchestrate process workflows to achieve force multiplication and reduce the burden of repetitive tasks on analysts. To achieve these benefits, a SOAR solution must be able to support flexible methods for implementing process workflows. The implementation of these workflows must be flexible enough to support almost any process which may need to be codified within the solution. Workflows should support the use of both built-in and custom integrations, as well as the creation of manual tasks to be completed by an analyst. Flow controlled workflows should support multiple types of flow control mechanisms, including those which allow for an analyst to make a manual decision before the workflow continues.  

3. Incident Management

Incident response is a complex process. Orchestration and automation of security products provide obvious value to any security program, but to maximize the time and monetary investment in a SOAR solution, a comprehensive SOAR solution should include additional features to manage the entire incident response lifecycle. This should include basic case management functionality, such as tracking cases, recording actions taken during the incident and providing reporting on critical metrics and KPIs. This should also include other ancillary functions such as detailed task tracking, evidence, and chain of custody management, asset management, and report management.  

4. Threat Intelligence

Actionable threat intelligence is a critical component in effective and efficient incident response. While simple threat intelligence feeds still provide some value and should be supported by a SOAR solution, to be truly effective in today’s threat landscape, threat intelligence must go above and beyond simple feeds. Because a SOAR solution has access to not only the indicators but also the rest of the incident information which can provide the additional context, it is in a unique position to gather actionable threat intelligence.

A proactive security program requires threat intelligence to be properly correlated to discover attack patterns, potential vulnerabilities and other ongoing risks to the organization. This correlation should be done automatically and it should be immediately clear if an ongoing incident may share common factors with any previous incidents. Because threat intelligence can consist of a vast amount of data, visual correlation is also an important factor when assessing threat intelligence capabilities.

5. Collaboration and Information Sharing

Incident response is not one player sport. Response to a security incident will likely include multiple individuals and potentially multiple teams and even organizations. To be effective in a team environment, a SOAR solution must support seamless collaboration and information sharing among team members in a controlled manner.  

Collaboration and information sharing must also be possible outside of the organization itself.  This is especially true in the context of threat intelligence. Open sharing of threat intelligence, when possible, it a critical tool in fighting cybercrime. There are numerous avenues available to share threat intelligence, open, closed and industry-specific. The majority of these threat intelligence sharing programs utilize one of the open standards for threat intelligence, such as STIX/TAXII, OpenIOC or MISP, and each of these standards should be supported by a SOAR solution.

For more information on any of these topics covered in this three-part series, please check out our whitepaper “Security Orchestration, Automation, and Response (SOAR) Technology” here.

Leveraging SOAR Technology to Facilitate Knowledge Transfer in Security Operations

Earlier this year I was talking to a colleague about the state of SOC operations and how I was looking forward to going to the SANS Security Operations Summit in New Orleans in July. The folks who attend SANS events are at the top of their game and let’s be honest, SANS provides some of the best training in our industry, so what’s not to love?

The conversation quickly turned to how to provide better scalability within SOC operations. Given that our teams are confronted with an increased number of alerts coming from more sophisticated actors on a daily basis, how do we keep up? We spoke about the need for better security automation to enrich the information available at the onset of an incident and how malware has been automating since the Morris worm 30 years ago.

At one point she asked me how best we can handle the transfer of incident handling “tribal knowledge” from the senior Incident Response personnel to the junior members, given the daily workload they carry. I thought about it for a moment and threw out that perhaps increased spending for machine learning or AI could help bridge the knowledge gap. She then asked, “Couldn’t we take that money and invest in knowledge transfer within the team instead?”. That simple and simultaneously complex question got me to thinking about how we can better utilize existing resources to provide that knowledge transfer in an environment as dynamic and rapidly changing as an Incident Response organization.

I thought this topic was interesting enough to make it my focus for my upcoming speaking engagement at SANS.

As we already know an increased workload coupled with an industry-wide shortage of skilled responders is heavily impacting operational performance in Security Operations Centers (SOC) globally and an integral part of the solution is formulating a methodology to ensure that crucial knowledge is retained and transferred between incident responders. By utilizing Security Orchestration, Automation and Response (SOAR) technology, security teams can combine traditional methods of knowledge transfer with more modern techniques and technologies.

Join me at the SANS Security Operations Summit on July 30, 2018 at Noon for an informal “Lunch and Learn” session to discuss how we ensure that the Incident Response knowledge possessed by our senior responders can be consistently and accurately passed along to the more junior team members while simultaneously contributing to the Incident Response process. I look forward to meeting you there.

If you are not attending the summit, don’t worry, you can visit our website to find out more information about the benefits of utilizing a SOAR solution with DFLabs’ IncMan SOAR platform.  Alternatively, if you would like to have a more in-depth discussion, you can arrange a demo to see IncMan live in action.

3 Core Pillars of a SOAR Solution

In our first blog in this series, we looked at some of the key drivers for Security Orchestration, Automation and Response (SOAR) adoption and what problems SOAR technology can help solve. Now, let’s look at the 3 core pillars which define what a SOAR solution is: Orchestration, Automation and Measurement.

The Core Pillars of a SOAR Solution: Orchestration, Automation, and Measurement

Security Orchestration

The number of technologies involved in today’s advanced security and incident response programs is exponentially more than it was even five years ago. While this has become necessary to effectively detect and respond to the current range and complexity of today’s threats, it has created its own problem; coordinating these into one seamless process. Switching between these multiple technologies, what Gartner refers to as “context switching”, can create enormous inefficiencies in an organization’s security program.

Technology integrations are the most common method used to support technology orchestration. There are numerous methods which can be used to integrate technologies through a SOAR solution, including common communication mechanisms such as syslog and email, as well as more complex, bidirectional integration methods such as API calls. Although technology is typically the primary focus of orchestration, it is equally important to consider the orchestration of people and processes in a holistic security program. Technology should be supported by effective processes, which should enable people to respond appropriately to security events. A strictly technology-centric security program is no longer adequate; people and processes must also be orchestrated properly to ensure that a security program is operating at its maximum efficiency.

Security Automation

Although the concepts of orchestration and automation are closely related, the goals they seek to achieve are fundamentally different. While orchestration is intended to increase efficiency through increased coordination and decreased context switching to support faster, more informed decision making, security automation is intended to reduce the time these processes take by automating repeatable processes and applying machine learning to appropriate tasks.  

The key to successful automation is the identification of predictable, repeatable processes which require minimal human intervention to perform. Automation should act as a force multiplier for security teams, reducing the mundane actions that must be manually performed and allowing analysts to focus on those actions which require human intervention. Although some processes may be fully automated, a SOAR technology solution must also support automation which allows for human intervention at critical decision points.  

Measurement

Because a SOAR solution sits at the crossroads of the incident response process, it is in an ideal location to collect a trove of information. Measurement of security information is key for making informed tactical and strategic security decisions. Proper measurement is what turns raw incident information into critical intelligence. Measurement of both tactical and strategic information is useless without proper display and visualization. A SOAR solution must support multiple methods for displaying and visualizing all information in an effective and easy to digest manner.

Stay tuned for our final blog in this series, where we will discuss the some of the critical components and functionality that a SOAR solution should contain. For more information on any of these topics, please check out our new whitepaper titled “Security Orchestration, Automation, and Response (SOAR) Technology” here.

Streamline Incident Management and Issue Tracking Using DFLabs SOAR and Jira

Security incidents are complex and dynamic events, requiring the coordinated participation from multiple teams across the organization. For these teams to work with maximum efficiency, as a single body, it is critical that information flows seamlessly between all teams in real-time. Faced with a continued onslaught of security incidents, organizations must find ways to maximize the utilization of their limited resources to remain ahead of the attackers and ensure the integrity of the organization’s critical resources.

This blog will briefly discuss how your security operations team can manage security incidents in a whole new and efficient way by integrating DFLabs IncMan Security Orchestration, Automation and Response (SOAR) platform with your existing Jira solution, including a simple use case.

It is critical to bridge the gap between security teams orchestrating incidents with SOAR solutions such as IncMan and teams tracking other tasks with Jira, to ensure that all teams maintain a holistic view of the incident and function together as a single, unified body.

The Challenges

Today there are many challenges faced by security teams within their specific security programs. By integrating DFLabs IncMan SOAR with Jira you will be able to overcome the following key problems:

  • How can I ensure that all teams have the most up-to-date incident information?
  • How can I integrate the power of IncMan into my existing issues management process?
  • How can I enable all teams to work as a single unified body to increase the efficiency of the incident response process?
  • How can I quickly communicate critical information to those outside the security team?


Let’s discuss how in more detail.

How to Streamline Incident Management and Issue Tracking With The DFLabs SOAR and Jira Solution

Security operations teams struggle to gain visibility of threats and rapidly respond to cyber incidents due to the sheer number of different security technologies they must maintain and manage and the resulting flood of alerts. Aggregating these into a single pane of glass to prioritize what is critical and needs immediate attention requires a platform that can consolidate disparate technologies and alerts, and provides a cohesive and comprehensive capability set to orchestrate incident response efforts.

Jira’s industry-leading issue tracking solution has been battle-tested and becomes the core of an organization’s support, IT, incident response and project management processes worldwide. Jira allows teams from across the organization to collaborate and share information to plan, track and report projects and issues in real-time, maximizing efficiency and reducing impacts on the organization’s critical business processes.

By integrating with Jira, DFLabs IncMan extends these capabilities to Jira users, combining the orchestration, automation and response power of IncMan with the organization’s existing issue tracking process. IncMan’s R3 Rapid Response Runbooks can be used to automatically create issues within Jira and continue to update the issue as the incident progresses.

Allowing organizations to seamlessly share information between IncMan and Jira ensures that all involved in the incident response process are working with a unified set of information, enabling organizations to maximize security analyst efficiency, reduce incident resolution time, as well as reduce the number of incidents handled.

Use Case

An alert of a host communicating with a potentially malicious domain has automatically generated an Incident within IncMan.This alert is automatically categorized within IncMan based on the organizations’ policies, which initiates the organization’s Domain reputation runbook, shown below:

incident management DFLabs


Through this runbook, IncMan automatically gathers domain reputation information for the domain which generated the alert. If the resulting domain reputation information indicates that the domain may be malicious, IncMan will use a Notification action to automatically create a new Issue within Jira, allowing Jira users to immediately begin next steps. Next, using additional Enrichment actions, IncMan will automatically gather additional information regarding the suspicious domain, such as WHOIS and geolocation information. IncMan will then automatically update the Jira issue with this information. Finally, a screenshot of the page (if applicable), is taken and added to IncMan.

The automated workflow of IncMan’s R3 Runbooks means that an IncMan incident and Jira issue will have been automatically generated, and these enrichment actions through the Quick Integration Connector with Jira and other enrichment sources will have already been committed before an analyst is even aware that an incident has occurred. Both IncMan and Jira users are now able to perform their respective tasks, knowing that they are each working with the same information, and can continue to do so as the incident progresses.  

By harnessing the power of Jira’s industry-leading issue tracking solution, along with the orchestration, automation and response capabilities of DFLab’s IncMan SOAR platform, organizations can elevate their incident response process, leading to faster and more effective incident response and reduced risk across the entire organization.

If you would like to see IncMan and Jira in action together in more detail, get in touch to request a live demo of IncMan with one of the team.

SOAR Technology – What Problems Are We Trying To Solve?


Increasing Adoption of SOAR Solutions

Over the past several years, Security Orchestration, Automation and Response (SOAR) has gone from being viewed as a niche product to one gaining traction across almost all industry verticals. Today, more and more private organizations, MSSPs and governments are turning to SOAR Technology to address previously unsolved problems in their security programs. SOAR is about taking action: “Automate. Orchestrate. Measure”. Organizations are implementing a SOAR solution to improve their incident response efficiency and effectiveness by orchestrating and automating their security operations processes. Gartner estimates that by 2019, 30% of mid to large-sized enterprises will leverage a SOAR technology, up from an estimated 5% in 2015.

In this three-part blog, we will discuss the key drivers for SOAR adoption and what problems a SOAR solution can help solve.  In the next blog, the second part of this three-part blog, we will discuss the three pillars of Security Orchestration, Automation and Response (SOAR). Finally, we will round out the series by discussing the critical components and functionality that a SOAR solution should contain.

Five Key Problems SOAR Technology Helps to Solve

Like many new product categories, Security Orchestration, Automation and Response (SOAR) technology was born from problems without solutions (or perhaps more accurately, problems which had grown beyond the point that they could be adequately solved with existing solutions). To define the product category more accurately, it is crucial to first understand what problems drove its creation. There are five key problems the SOAR market space has evolved to address.

  • Increased workload combined with budget constraints and competition for skilled analysts means that organizations are being forced to do more with less

As the number and sophistication of threats has grown over the past decade, there has been an explosion in the number of security applications in the enterprise. Security analysts are being forced to work within multiple platforms, manually gathering desperate data from each source, then manually enriching and correlating that data. Although it may not be as difficult to find security analysts as it once was, a truly skilled security analyst is still somewhat of a rare breed.  Intense competition for these skill analysts means that organizations must often choose between hiring one highly skilled analyst, or several more junior analysts.

  • Valuable analyst time is being consumed sorting through a plethora of alerts and performing mundane tasks to triage and determine the veracity of the alerts

Even when alerts are centrally managed and correlated through a SIEM, the number of alerts is often overwhelming for security teams.  Each one of these alerts must be manually verified and triaged by an analyst.  Alerts which are determined to be valid then require additional manual research and enrichment before any real action can be taken to address the potential threat. While these manual processes are taking place, other alerts sit unresolved in the queue and additional alerts continue to roll in.

  • Security incidents are becoming more costly, meaning that organizations must find new ways to further reduce the mean time to detection and the mean time to resolution

The cost of the average incident has increased steadily year on year. The immediate cost of an incident due to lost sales, employee time spent, consulting hours, legal fees and lawsuits is relatively easy to quantify. The financial loss due to reputational damage, however, can be much more difficult to accurately measure. Reducing the time to detect and resolve potential security incidents must be an absolute priority. Each hour that a security incident persists is effectively money out of the door.

  • Tribal knowledge is inherently difficult to codify, and often leaves the organization with personnel changes

Employee retention is an issue faced by almost every security team. Highly skilled analysts are an extremely valuable resource for which competition is always high. Each time an organization loses a seasoned analyst, some tribal knowledge is lost with them and they are replaced with an analyst who, even if they possess the same technical skills, will lack this tribal knowledge for at least a period of time. Training new analysts takes time, especially when processes are manual and complex.  Documenting security processes is a complex, but critical task for all security teams.

  • Security operations are inherently difficult to measure and manage effectively

Unlike other business units which may have more concrete methods for measuring the success or failure of a program, security metrics are often much more abstract and subjective. Traditional approaches to measuring return on investment are often not appropriate for security projects and can lead to inaccurate or misleading results. Properly measuring the effectiveness and efficiency of a security product or program requires a measurement process specially designed to meet these unique requirements.

About DFLabs IncMan SOAR

DFLabs is an award-winning and recognized global leader in Security Orchestration, Automation and Response (SOAR) technology. Its pioneering purpose-built platform, IncMan SOAR, enables SOCs, CSIRTs, and MSSPs to automate, orchestrate and measure security operations and incident response processes and tasks. IncMan SOAR drives intelligence-driven command and control of security operations, by orchestrating the full incident response and investigation lifecycle and empowers security analysts, forensic investigators and incident responders to respond to, track, predict and visualize cyber security incidents.  As its flagship product, IncMan SOAR has been adopted by Fortune 500 and Global 2000 organizations worldwide.

Schedule a live demo with one of our cyber security specialists here and see DFLabs IncMan SOAR platform in action. For more information on any of these topics, please check out our new whitepaper titled “Security Orchestration, Automation, and Response (SOAR) Technology” here.

Stay tuned for our next blog in this series, where we will discuss the three pillars of SOAR technology.  

Gain Actionable Threat Intelligence Utilizing DFLabs SOAR and IBM X-Force Exchange

Threats are constantly evolving, and new threats emerge daily. Minimizing risk and the cost associated with security incidents means making rapid decisions based on the up-to-date and accurate information. Actionable threat intelligence can play a critical role in a proactive security program, as well as conducting efficient and effective incident response. Making incident response decisions based on incomplete or inaccurate intelligence can result in an incomplete or delayed response, residual risk and increased loss due to downtime, response cost, and fines.

Many security programs today experience challenges around gaining actionable and accurate threat intelligence and are looking for solutions to overcome these two key problems:

  • How can I enrich incident indicators with actionable threat intelligence to make more informed decisions during the incident response process?
  • How can I proactively gather threat intelligence data to ensure that my security team stays up to date on the latest threats and ongoing trends?

In this blog, we will briefly discuss how a security program can automate the collection of actionable threat intelligence from IBM experts utilizing IBM X-Force Exchange with its integration with DFLabs.

The DFLabs and IBM X-Force Exchange Solution

IBM X-Force Exchange is a cloud-based threat intelligence platform that allows security teams to consume, share and act on threat intelligence. It enables analysts to rapidly research the latest global security threats, aggregate actionable intelligence, consult with experts and collaborate with peers. IBM X-Force Exchange, supported by human- and machine-generated intelligence, leverages the scale of IBM X-Force to help users stay ahead of emerging threats.

DFLabs IncMan SOAR platform and IBM X-Force Exchange bring actionable threat intelligence sourced from the experts at IBM as well as industry peers, together with the automation and orchestration power of IncMan to deliver industry-leading incident response capabilities. Together, these solutions allow joint customers to make better, more informed automated and manual decisions, reducing the risk posed by security incidents.

Enriching incident indicators with actionable threat intelligence enable enterprises to reduce incident resolution times, maximize security analyst efficiency, as well as increase the number of handled incidents.

Use Case in Action

An alert based on an internal host communicating with a potentially malicious URL has automatically generated an Incident within IncMan. This alert is automatically categorized as a Malicious Communication incident within IncMan based on the organizations’ policies, which initiates the organization’s Malicious Communication runbook, shown below:

 

This runbook begins by utilizing several IBM X-Force Exchange integration actions to enrich the alert information, in this case, the potentially malicious domain. First, a WHOIS lookup of the domain is performed using IBM X-Force Exchange. Next, any threat intelligence regarding this URL is retrieved from IBM X-Force Exchange using the URL Reputation action.

After gathering intelligence on the initially reported URL, the runbook pivots outward and performs a DNS record search through IBM X-Force Exchange. For each DNS record returned, the runbook performs a WHOIS lookup on the IP address, followed by a threat intelligence search on the IP address through IBM X-Force Exchange.

Once all available threat intelligence has been retrieved from IBM X-Force Exchange, the runbook reaches an automated decision point. In this case, the runbook examines the threat intelligence for any threat score meeting a certain threshold. If this threshold is met, IncMan will automatically send a notification to the security team, then automatically update the incident type to that of a confirmed security incident. Following this notification and incident update, the security analyst will be prompted to determine whether or not automated containment actions are appropriate.

In Summary

Actionable threat intelligence can play a critical role in a proactive security program, as well as conducting efficient and effective incident response.

By using DFLabs IncMan R3 Rapid Response Runbooks to automate the collection of actionable threat intelligence from the experts at IBM, as well as industry peers through the IBM X-Force Exchange, security teams can enrich indicators and gather additional intelligence to make faster, more informed decisions when the time is of the essence.

If you would like to see a more in-depth demo of this use case in action, or other use cases within IncMan, please get in touch.

Understanding the Noise Using Security Orchestration, Automation and Response

“Noise” is a prevalent term in the cyber security industry. Here at DFLabs – Security Orchestration, Automation and Response Platform, we consistently receive feedback from vendor partners and clients that one of the major issues they face on daily basis is the ability to sift through the noise in order to understand and differentiate an actual critical problem from a lost cause.

What is “noise”?

Noise is a vast amount of information passed from security products that can have little or no meaning to the person receiving the information. Typically, lots of products are not tuned or adapted for certain environments and therefore would present more information than needed or required.

Noise is a problem to all of us in the cyber security industry, as there are meanings within these messages that are on many occasions simply ignored or passed over for higher priorities. For example, having policies and procedures that are incorrectly identified or adapted, or a product is not properly aligned within the network topology.

There is not one security product that can deal with every attack vector that organizations experience today. What’s more disturbing about this paradigm is that most of the tools and technologies within the security infrastructure do not talk to each other natively, yet all them have intelligence data that can overlay to enrich security operations and incident response teams.

Understanding the Noise Using Security Orchestration, Automation and Response

Cyber incident investigative teams spend a vast number of hours carrying out simple administrative tasks that could easily be relieved by introducing an effective security orchestration, automation and response  (SOAR) solution. Given the sheer volume of alerts, we can see from SIEM products on a day to day basis, a Security Orchestration Automation and Response SOAR tool can be used in conjunction to execute most, if not all of the human to machine actions, following best practice per type of incident and company guidelines, all through automated playbooks.

Re-thinking what information is being presented and how we deal with it is the biggest question. There are several ways to manage this:

  • Fully automating the noise worthy tasks.
    If these are consistently coming into your Security Operations Center (SOC) causing you to spend more time on administration than investigation, it may be prudent to schedule the tasks in this manner.
  • Semi-automation of tasks can give your SOC teams more control over how to deal with huge numbers.
    Automating 95% of these tasks and then having an analyst to provide the last sign off via manual look over, can heavily reduce time if your organization is against fully automating the process.
  • Leverage all of your existing products to provide better insight into the incident.
    For example, leverage an existing Active Directory to lock out or suspend a user account if they log in outside of normal business hours. Additionally, it’s possible to sandbox and snapshot that machine to understand what is happening. A key consideration here is to make sure not to disrupt work at every opportunity. It really is a balancing act, however, depending on their privilege you may want to act faster for some users compared to others depending on their role and responsibilities.

During the second half of 2018, the readiness and capability to respond to a variety of cyber incidents will continue to be at the top of every C-level agenda. By leveraging the security orchestration automation and response capabilities offered by DFLabs’ IncMan SOAR platform, stakeholders can provide 360-degree visibility during each stage of the incident response lifecycle. This provides not only consistency across investigations for personnel but encourages the implementation of Supervised Active Intelligence across the entire incident response spectrum.

At DFLabs we showcase our capacity to reduce the investigative time and incident dwell time, all while increasing incident handling consistency and reducing liability. Arming your SOC teams with information prior to the start of their incident investigation will help to drive focus purely on the incidents that need attention rather than the noise.

Please contact us to discuss how we can work together to grow your incident response capabilities or schedule a demonstration of how we can utilize what you already have and make it more effective and efficient.

Transitioning Your SOC Analysts from Data Gatherers to Threat Hunters

Threat hunting is defined as an iterative and focused approach to searching, understanding and identifying internal adversaries that are found in the defender’s network. It’s been shown that incident response automation tools can provide Security Operations Center (SOC) team members with additional time that can be leveraged in a more focused, threat hunting role within the SOC environment.

The SOC staff members should have some understanding of how they can use this additional time provided by incident response automation to enable them to hunt for threats, rather than spending valuable time and resources gathering threat information which could otherwise be done in an automated fashion.  It’s long been established as we make the migration from threat prevention to threat discovery that malicious actors and processes are frequently well-hidden within the organizations infrastructure and in order to effectively locate and investigate them we must start by asking the 5 W’s, who, what where, when, why and perhaps most importantly, how.

SOC team members must first understand what threat hunting is to be truly effective. The staff members should channel their question on the three tenets that make up the threat triangle; capability, intent, and the opportunity. By focusing on these three tenets, threat hunters can leverage orchestration to accomplish not only the system monitoring but the automated data gathering to support this expanded role without adding additional infrastructure. Additionally, team members must understand that the threats can be human and not just, for example, malware that is directed at them. This, coupled with an understanding of the affected systems function, will help provide the insight into possible contributing factors to the incident.

As the level of automation scales upward, we’ve seen a corresponding scaling of the transition from simple incident data gatherers to data hunters. Additional time and resources will become available to teams that leverage incident automation, permitting them to forego the traditional gatherer role and begin to embrace a more proactive hunter role. The good news is both of these roles can be supported within the SOC and also within the same Security Orchestration, Automation and Response (SOAR) platform. IncMan SOAR from DFLabs provides the necessary combination of force multiplication and machine learning to ensure that not only are incidents capable of being prioritized automatically, but the necessary actions for successful resolution are available at incident inception.

If you would like to see how a SOAR platform can give your incident response team the necessary tools to make the migration from simple data gatherers to threat hunters, reach out to us for a free, no obligation demo.

Enabling Faster and More Efficient Cyber Security Incident Response with LogPoint SIEM and DFLabs SOAR

Cyber Security Incidents: The Problem and Challenges

Cyber security incidents are complex, potentially involving numerous assets being monitored by a myriad of different prevention and detection technologies. Investigating a cyber security incident requires the involvement of many different people, processes and technologies, all of which must work together seamlessly for an effective and efficient response. Failure to properly orchestrate these many moving parts can lead to increased risk, exposure and losses.

During a cyber security incident, context is key. Without proper context, analysts and managers are unable to make informed decisions regarding potential risk, containment, and recovery. Providing this necessary context can be a manual, time-consuming tasks, wasting valuable time as attackers continue to move throughout the network unobstructed.

Therefore, it is critical for security programs to implement an overall solution that aims to solve three key challenges:

  1. How can I use my existing resources more effectively?
  2. How can I reduce the mean time to detection (MTTD)?
  3. How can I reduce the mean time to response (MTTR)?

Combine the Power of LogPoint SIEM with DFLabs SOAR to Enable Faster and More Efficient Cyber Security Incident Response

The DFLabs and LogPoint Solution

DFLabs IncMan Security Orchestration, Automation, and Response (SOAR) platform automates, orchestrates and measures security operations and incident response tasks including threat validation, triage and escalation, context enrichment and threat containment. IncMan uses machine learning and Rapid Response Runbooks (R3 Runbooks) as a force multiplier that has enabled security teams to reduce average incident resolution times and increase incident handling.

LogPoint’s SIEM system is designed from the ground up to be simple, flexible, and scalable, providing a streamlined design, deployment, and integration tools to open the use of SIEM tooling up to all businesses. This means that the architecture can be continuously extended with additional functionality without the need for a full major release, to continue to support your business’s growing and changing needs.

Each as their standalone solution has their merits but also have their limitations. SIEMs are traditionally more commonly used within security operations infrastructure, ingesting large volumes of data, providing real-time analytics while generating alerts, but not all of these alerts can realistically be handled manually by security analysts. Orchestration and automation are critical components in responding effectively and efficiently to a cyber security incident. DFLabs IncMan SOAR platform is layered on top of the SIEM to manage the incident response process to each alert. Combing the aggregation, storage and analytics power of LogPoint with the orchestration, automation and response power of IncMan drastically multiplies the impact of the existing security program by removing the analyst from the repetitive, mundane tasks, allowing analysts to focus their time and energy where they can have the greatest impact.

Together they can provide security programs with the ability to:

  1. Automate repeatable, mundane tasks.
  2. Orchestrate actions across multiple security tools.
  3. Enrich raw data, allowing for more informed, effective decisions.
  4. Reduce the mean time to detection and mean time to response, minimizing potential risk.
Use Case in Action

A proxy has observed an internal host communicating with an IP address which is known to be a command and control server used by malicious actors.  The proxy generated an alert, which was forwarded to LogPoint. Using the IncMan app, Logpoint automatically forwarded the event to IncMan, which automatically generated an incident and began an automated response, including executing the R3 Runbook shown below.

The runbook begins by performing several basic Enrichment actions, such as performing a Whois query and an IP geolocation search. These Enrichment actions are followed by a Containment action, which is used to block the malicious IP address at the perimeter firewall.

Once the initial IP address is blocked, an additional Enrichment action is used query LogPoint for a list of all IP addresses the internal host has communicated within the past 30 minutes. Next, an Enrichment action is used to query each of these IP addresses against the organization’s threat reputation service of choice (for example, VirusTotal, Cisco Umbrella or McAfee ATD).

Any IP addresses which have a negative reputation will undergo a similar process to the initially identified malicious IP address; first utilizing several Enrichment actions to perform basic data enrichment, then being blocked at the perimeter firewall using a Containment action.

Once these IP addresses have been blocked to prevent any additional risk, LogPoint is again queried; this time for any other internal hosts which may have been communicating with these additional malicious IP addresses.

If any other internal hosts have been observed communicating with any of these additional malicious IP addresses, a final Enrichment action will be used to gather further information regarding each internal host from the IT asset inventory. This information will be automatically stored within the IncMan Incident and will be available for an analyst for review and follow up.

To ensure that each additionally potentially compromised internal host is further investigated by an analyst, a Notification action is used to immediately notify security team leaders about the identification of these additional potentially compromised hosts. If the organization were utilizing an IT ticketing system, an additional integration could be used to automatically generate an IT ticket to ensure additional accountability.

Minimizing the time from threat discovery to resolution from hours to seconds

The combination of a SIEM and a SOAR solution can provide real end-to-end visibility to neutralize potential cyber threats. By providing early detection and faster remediation of security incidents it can totally transform the security operations and incident response capability of any organization’s security program. Adopting this structure will inevitably minimize the time from threat discovery to resolution but can also have a positive impact on many other factors including improved operational performance, increased return on investment of existing security technologies, reduced risk resulting from security incidents while meeting legal and regulatory compliance.