R3 Rapid Response Runbook for Spear Phishing

Posted byDFLabs - 13th Dec 2017
R3 Rapid Response Runbook for Spear Phishing

According to Verizon’s Data Breach Investigations report 2017, social engineering was a factor in 43% of breaches, with Phishing accounting for 93% of social attacks.

DFlabs has worked closely with our customers to draft and deploy Phishing specific runbooks. In this article, we take a look at an example R3 Phishing runbook below.

The Premise
Our premise is that an incident appears to be a Spear Phishing attempt has been forwarded to the SOC. The SOC team must qualify the incident and determine what needs to be done to mitigate the attack.

We begin our investigation with an incident observable, a fully qualified domain name (FQDN).

We will correlate the FQDN with several external threat intelligence services to assess whether this is truly an ongoing Phishing attempt or a benign false positive. We have used VirusTotal and Cisco Umbrella in this example, but other threat intelligence and malware services could be used instead.

We have 3 different potential outcomes and associated decision paths:

R3 Rapid Response Runbook for Spear Phishing 7


The R3 Runbook

1. The FQDN is automatically extracted from the incident alert and then sent to Cisco Umbrella Investigate for a classification.

R3 Rapid Response Runbook for Spear Phishing 1

 

2. Depending on the outcome – whether Cisco Umbrella Investigate classifies the FQDN as benign or malicious – we can take one of two different paths.

R3 Rapid Response Runbook for Spear Phishing 2

 

3. The FQDN will be rechecked with VirusTotal to verify the result. We do this whether the first classification was malicious or benign. At this point we do not know whether one of the two services is returning a false positive or a false negative, so we do a double check.

R3 Rapid Response Runbook for Spear Phishing 3

 

4. IF both external 3rd party queries confirm that the FQDN is malicious, we have a high degree of certainty that this is a harmful Phishing attempt and can step through automatically to containment. In our example, we automatically block the domain on a web gateway.

R3 Rapid Response Runbook for Spear Phishing 4

 

5. Alternatively, if only one of the two queries returns a malicious classification, we need to hand the runbook off to a security analyst to conduct a manual investigation. At this point, we cannot determine in an automated manner where the misclassification resides. It could be that one of the services has stale data, or doesn’t include the FQDN in its database. With the ambiguous result, we lack the degree of confidence in the detection to trust executing fully automated containment.

R3 Rapid Response Runbook for Spear Phishing 5

 

6. If both VirusTotal and Cisco Umbrella Investigate return a non-malicious classification, no further action will be necessary at this point. We will notify the relevant users that the incident has been resolved as a false positive and can close the case for now.

R3 Rapid Response Runbook for Spear Phishing 6

 

This R3 Phishing Runbook demonstrates the flexibility and efficiency of automating incident response . Incident Qualification is automated as much as is feasible but keeps a human in the loop when cognitive skills are required. It only automates containment when the degree of confidence is sufficient. It eliminates false positives without requiring human intervention.