Security Orchestration and Response – Understanding the Noise

Posted bySteven Ditmore - 13th Feb 2017
Security Orchestration and Response - Understanding the Noise

“Noise” is a prevalent term in the cyber security industry. DFLabs consistently receives feedback from vendor partners and clients that one of the major issues they face daily is the ability to sift through noise in order to understand and differentiate an actual critical problem from a wild goose chase.

Noise is vast amount of information passed from security products that can have little or no meaning to the person receiving this information. Typically, lots of products are not tuned or adapted for certain environments and therefore would present more information than needed or required.

Noise is a problem to all of us in the security industry, as there are meanings within these messages that are many times simply ignored or passed over for higher priorities. For example, having policies and procedures that are incorrectly identified or adapted or the product is not properly aligned within the network topology.

There is no one security product that can deal with every attack vector that businesses experience today. What’s more disturbing about this paradigm is that the products do not talk to each other natively, yet all these products have intelligence data that can overlay to enrich security and incident response teams.

Cyber incident investigative teams spending a vast number of hours doing simple administration that can be relieved by introducing an effective case management system. Given the sheer volume we can see from SIEM products on a day to day basis we can execute all of the human to machine actions and follow best practice per type of incident and company guidelines through automated playbooks.

Re-thinking about what information is being presented and how we deal with it is the biggest question. There are several ways to manage this:

• Fully automating the noise worthy tasks. If these are consistently coming into your Security Operations Center (SOC) causing you to spend more time on administration than investigation, it may be prudent to schedule the tasks in this manner.
• Semi-Automation of tasks can give your SOC teams more control of how to deal with huge numbers. Automating 95% of the task and then giving this last sign off a manual look over can heavily reduce time if your organisation is against completely automating the process.
• Leverage all your existing products to provide better insight into the incident. For example, leverage an existing active directory to lock out or suspend a user account if they log in outside of normal business hours. Additionally it’s possible to sandbox and snapshot that machine to understand what is happening. A key consideration here is to make sure not to disrupt work at every opportunity. It really is a balancing act, however depending on their privilege you may want to act faster for some users than others.

In 2017, the readiness and capability to respond to a variety of cyber incidents will continue to be at the top of every C-level agenda.

By leveraging the orchestration and automation capabilities afforded by IncMan™, stake holders can provide 360-degree visibility during each stage of the incident response life cycle. This provides not only consistency across investigations for personnel, but encourages the implementation of Supervised Active Intelligence™ across the entire incident response spectrum.

At DFLabs we showcase our capacity to reduce investigative time, incident dwell time all while increasing incident handling consistency and reducing liability. Arming your SOC teams with information prior to the start of their incident investigation will help to drive focus purely on the incidents that need attention rather than the noise.

If you’re interested in seeing how we can work together to grow your incident response capabilities, visit us at https://www.DFLabs.com and schedule a demonstration of how we can utilize what you already have and make it better.