Automatic Observable Harvesting With IncMan SOAR

As soon as the first indicator of compromise is located, the most common next step is to try to pivot from that indicator to find additional indicators or evidence on the network. While it is sometimes necessary to perform your own research to determine what additional additional indicators may be present, it is common to make use of previous research when looking for new indicators to hunt for.

This is especially true when dealing with an indicator of malicious software.  Perhaps you have found a host communicating with an IP address known to be associated with a particular malware variant; the logical next step would be to search for communication with other IPs, domains and URLs the malware may be associated with, along with looking for the host-based activity the malware is known to use.

For example, suppose an IDS alerted on the IP address 144.202.87[.]106.  A quick search on VirusTotal indicates that this IP address may be malicious, however, it does not provide much information which could be used to pivot to other indicators.  So where does every good analyst turn at this point? Google, of course! A quick Google search for the IP address returns several results, including a blog post from MalwareBytes on the Hidden Bee miner. 

Along with a detailed analysis of the Hidden Bee miner, the post also includes several other IP addresses and URLs which analysts observed in this attack.  Now we have some data to pivot and hunt with!

This entire analysis from the MalwareBytes team can easily be added into DFLabs’ IncMan SOAR platform by copying and pasting the blog into the Additional Info section of the incident.  In addition to allowing this information to be accessed by the working on this incident, adding this text to the Additional Info field has an additional advantage we have not yet discussed; Automatic Observable Harvesting.

When text is added to a field such as the Additional Info fields in IncMan, Automatic Observable Harvesting will automatically parse through the text and attempt to harvest observables from the unstructured text.

In the case of the Hidden Bee analysis from MalwareBytes, Automatic Observable Harvesting automatically harvested four IP addresses, a URL and a domain from the unstructured text and added them to the observables section.

While six observables may not take long to manually enter into the platform, it is not uncommon to find detailed malware analysis that contains dozens of IP addresses, hash values, domains, and other observables. Entering this many observables into IncMan manually in order to take advantage of IncMan’s automation and orchestration features on the new observables would be a time-consuming process. Automatic Observable Harvesting performs this task automatically.

Once these new observables are added into IncMan, analysts can take advantage of IncMan’s automation and orchestration features to begin performing additional enrichment on the observables, as well as searching across any internal data sources for evidence of the observables and blocking them if needed.

If you would like to see IncMan SOAR from DFLabs in action, including its Automatic Observable Harvesting functionality, get in touch to arrange and see one to one demo now.

Understanding the Noise Using Security Orchestration, Automation and Response

“Noise” is a prevalent term in the cyber security industry. Here at DFLabs – Security Orchestration, Automation and Response Platform, we consistently receive feedback from vendor partners and clients that one of the major issues they face on daily basis is the ability to sift through the noise in order to understand and differentiate an actual critical problem from a lost cause.

What is “noise”?

Noise is a vast amount of information passed from security products that can have little or no meaning to the person receiving the information. Typically, lots of products are not tuned or adapted for certain environments and therefore would present more information than needed or required.

Noise is a problem to all of us in the cyber security industry, as there are meanings within these messages that are on many occasions simply ignored or passed over for higher priorities. For example, having policies and procedures that are incorrectly identified or adapted, or a product is not properly aligned within the network topology.

There is not one security product that can deal with every attack vector that organizations experience today. What’s more disturbing about this paradigm is that most of the tools and technologies within the security infrastructure do not talk to each other natively, yet all them have intelligence data that can overlay to enrich security operations and incident response teams.

Understanding the Noise Using Security Orchestration, Automation and Response

Cyber incident investigative teams spend a vast number of hours carrying out simple administrative tasks that could easily be relieved by introducing an effective security orchestration, automation and response  (SOAR) solution. Given the sheer volume of alerts, we can see from SIEM products on a day to day basis, a Security Orchestration Automation and Response SOAR tool can be used in conjunction to execute most, if not all of the human to machine actions, following best practice per type of incident and company guidelines, all through automated playbooks.

Re-thinking what information is being presented and how we deal with it is the biggest question. There are several ways to manage this:

  • Fully automating the noise worthy tasks.
    If these are consistently coming into your Security Operations Center (SOC) causing you to spend more time on administration than investigation, it may be prudent to schedule the tasks in this manner.
  • Semi-automation of tasks can give your SOC teams more control over how to deal with huge numbers.
    Automating 95% of these tasks and then having an analyst to provide the last sign off via manual look over, can heavily reduce time if your organization is against fully automating the process.
  • Leverage all of your existing products to provide better insight into the incident.
    For example, leverage an existing Active Directory to lock out or suspend a user account if they log in outside of normal business hours. Additionally, it’s possible to sandbox and snapshot that machine to understand what is happening. A key consideration here is to make sure not to disrupt work at every opportunity. It really is a balancing act, however, depending on their privilege you may want to act faster for some users compared to others depending on their role and responsibilities.

During the second half of 2018, the readiness and capability to respond to a variety of cyber incidents will continue to be at the top of every C-level agenda. By leveraging the security orchestration automation and response capabilities offered by DFLabs’ IncMan SOAR platform, stakeholders can provide 360-degree visibility during each stage of the incident response lifecycle. This provides not only consistency across investigations for personnel but encourages the implementation of Supervised Active Intelligence across the entire incident response spectrum.

At DFLabs we showcase our capacity to reduce the investigative time and incident dwell time, all while increasing incident handling consistency and reducing liability. Arming your SOC teams with information prior to the start of their incident investigation will help to drive focus purely on the incidents that need attention rather than the noise.

Please contact us to discuss how we can work together to grow your incident response capabilities or schedule a demonstration of how we can utilize what you already have and make it more effective and efficient.